Таблетки для похудения эффективные. Эффективные зеленые таблетки для похудения. Таблетки для похудения отзывы цена. Сердечная недостаточность симптомы. Бывает ли острое сердечное недостаточность. Острая сердечная недостаточность причины. Народное лечение гипертонии. Лучшие методы лечения гипертонии. Артериальная гипертония лечение. Методы лечения алкогольной зависимости. Лечение алкогольной зависимости в домашних условиях. Быстрое лечение алкогольной зависимости отзывы. Мужское бесплодие причины. Важные бесплодие причины лечение. Психологические причины бесплодия. Ринопластика до и после. Сколько стоит ринопластика в россии. Рнопластика кончика носа. Сделать пластическую операцию. Где сделать пластическая операция лица. Сколько стоит пластическая операция. Лечение артериальной гипертензии. Артериальная гипертензия рекомендации от доктора. Артериальная гипертензия степени риска.

Find Your Best Essay 

If you are looking for high-quality and well-written essays for free, our essay base is what you need. Thousands of free samples on this site help you in writing on every topic.

Essay Categories 

On our site you can find samples of essays of different categories. You can get them for free and use for your own research.

Arts and Music
Business and Economics
College Admissions
Personal Essays
Travel and Tourism
Science and Technology
Social Issues
    - Love
    - Family
    - Life
    - Health and Medicine
    - Religion and Theology
    - Nature
    - Sports
    - Law


Travel and Tourism

If you are going somewhere you need find out more about that place: what is the culture of the country of your destination, how to get there better, cheaper, and more comfortable or in the most unusual way. Different destinations, cities, countries, cuisines, attractions, extreme tourism – a great variety of interesting and useful topics is in this category for free.

Essays about Travel and Tourism:

Kupu Whakataki - Part 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 3.25 (2 Votes)
Kupu Whakataki - Part 1 - 3.0 out of 5 based on 2 votes

Before embarking on an account of the events which occurred at the Bay of Islands, a description is necessary of the attractions of the area from Whangarei northwards, which for hundreds of years had made it one of the most sought-after and fought-over territory in NZ. For climatic reasons alone, the area was probably the earliest settled, and would certainly have been the first choice of migrant Polynesians from the tropical islands of the Pacific. Only in the north would the kumara survive the winter in the ground, and only there could it have been propagated until the techniques for it’s survival were evolved, making it’s cultivation possible further south. In Tai Tokerau, Māori society was successively and intensively converged on by explorers, whalers, traders, missionaries, and eventually the whole gamut of British sovereignty and colonisation. Amidst the confusion and complexity of Pakehā economic, moral and social principals assailing Māori intellect and lifestyle, impressions of great consequence were political and primarily converged on land.

In this country we have two cultures which view history in entirely different ways. In the predominant western culture the future is described as being in front of us, that which we are moving towards.

With indigenous peoples in various parts of the world when they speak about the future they will pass their hand backward over their shoulder. Because the future is what you cannot see. What you can see is the past. That is what you face – not the future. The future is unknown and only has meaning if you face the past.

This is a very powerful image for me. Two peoples each regarding history in as different way. The western view of the future pervades a lot of our general community thinking about Maori related issues and does not provide a good environment in which to consider the injustices of the past.

Kupu Whakataki - Part 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 5.00 (1 Vote)
Kupu Whakataki - Part 2 - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

An Eye for an Eye…

The first recorded use of musket in tribal warfare was at Moremonui near Manganui in 1807, between Hokianga Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Whātua. Over the next seven years muskets continued to be used in skirmishes among Ngāpuhi and between Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Whātua of Kaipara, but they were present in limited numbers and tended to be used in hand-to-hand combat fashion, in the manner of traditional weapons. The scale of attacks increased after Hongi visited England and Australia in 1820 and 1821 returning with over 1,000 muskets. As other tribes acquired muskets for defence, a new type of fortified pā evolved that were specifically designed for musket defence. The Āmiowhenua expedition of 1821 was the largest, going southward from the Kaipara, through Auckland and the Waikato River area to the regions of Hawks Bay and Wellington. returning north along the west coast. Because they had muskets, Ngāpuhi were able to inflict several devastating defeats against other tribes which include:
 Ngāti Porou at Whetūmatarau near East Cape in 1820
 Ngāti Whātua at Te Ika a Ranganui near Whangarei in 1821
 Ngāti Pāoa at Mauinaina in Auckland in 1821
 The Marutūahu tribes at Te Tōtara in the Coromandel
 The Waikato tribes at Mātakitaki in 1822
 Te Arawa at Mokoia Island on Lake Rotorua in 1823

Hongi had many alliances, even marrying many of those he captured to Ngāpuhi women, in an effort to reduce utu from the tribes he attacked.

Kupu Whakataki - Part 4

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 5.00 (1 Vote)
Kupu Whakataki - Part 4 - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

An Analytical View of the History of Ngapuhi
Prior to 1800 – Present Day 2007

This assignment has focused on Ngapuhi but as colonisation has impacted on all iwi and has seen our identity generalised into one culture as Māori, these issues may also be relevant for all Māori. It must also be noted that although the issues such as land, laws, and political alliances have been mentioned in isolation, for Māori they all occur across the time spans, all interlink, and all impact on one another. This assignment has given me the opportunity to begin my journey of discovery by delving into the past, into the history of my iwi, my people, and therefore myself so that I may have an informed view of the history pertaining to my iwi within the broader pantheon of NZ history.

 1800-Ngaa Tapuwae Nuku
Prior to the 1800s, when Tāne Mahuta, the giant kauri of the Waipoua forest was probably no more than a seedling, Kupe led the way to the 'Promised Land’ leaving his personal stamp on the new land by naming many places along the coasts of both islands including Hokianga. The fearless determination of Kupe to navigate into the vast unknown together with his crew shows the warrior spirit needed to undertake such a venture. This same warrior spirit was recognised in many Ngāpuhi chiefs and leaders where their notable fighting prowess made significant additions to Ngāpuhi lands. With strategic alliances Ngāpuhi hapū could call upon unity in times of need which ultimately led to Ngāpuhi being the largest tribe in their new land.

Kupu Whakataki - Part 3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 5.00 (1 Vote)
Kupu Whakataki - Part 3 - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

1901 – 1938
Te Waa Taurangi-The Seeds of Change

The Bay of Islands regions natural resources of timber, kauri gum and flax were its means of trade and income. It’s extraction was difficult because of the rough nature of the country, and the high rainfall with its resulting mud and slush. The effect of this was to keep the timber and flax mills close to water transport. However the activities of the timber millers and gum diggers did clear land for the settlers. As the natural resources of the north began to run out in the early 1900s its economy undertook a radical change, farming prospered, the timber mills being replaced by dairy factories.
Livestock farming developed first to supplement natural resources such as timber and kauri gum, and then to replace them. Although much of the north was not ideal for farming, many areas were gradually brought into use for sheep and cattle. Small dairy factories had been established by 1910. But progress was held back by the region’s isolation, remoteness, poor access, infertile soils and the uneconomic size of holdings. To overcome the many obstacles to farming, the government introduced development schemes for land owned by Māori or the Crown. The Māori schemes began in the 1930s, and were only partially successful. Title and tenure difficulties were only gradually sorted out in the mid-1950s. The farms were generally too small, and many Māori migrated to Auckland in search of work. After the Second World War, state subsidies and grasslands research assisted farming.

Some Facts About Modern Egypt

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 5.00 (1 Vote)
Some Facts About Modern Egypt - 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 vote

Official Name: Arab Republic of Egypt (Jumhuriyah Misr al-'Arabiyah)
Capital: Cairo
Location: Northeast corner of Africa and the Sinai Peninsula
Population: 82,999,393 (2009)
Official Religion: Islam
Religions: Sunni Islam, 89%; Christian, 11%
Official Language: Arabic
Monetary Unit: Egyptian pound
National Anthem: ""Bilady, Bilady, Bilady""

Egyptian burials today

Egyptians used to shroud corpses in mats or furs and put them them in pots, baskets or clay coffins. In some areas a wooden scaffold was buit around the body. A sarcophagus was also usually provided to hold the coffin in the tomb.

Today most people are buried in ordinary coffins just like here in the England. They do not build pyramids to put them in either.

Life in Egypt today

Life in Egypt is almost the same as in England. They go to school or work, have meals with their family, spend time with their friends, and go to the supermarket, much the same as we do. Most Egyptians live in apartment buildings. Only the wealthy can afford to live in free-standing houses because space is difficult to find. Men and women usually live at home with their parents until they get married. Apartments usually have one large room in the front - the living room, where the family entertains guests. Guests who are not relatives are generally not permitted back into the rest of the house. Traditionally, women would stay in the back of the house and not come into the living room if someone who was not a close friend or family visited, although this is less common now. It is, however, considered inappropriate for a woman and man who are not married or related to be alone together.

Featured Essays 

Depression, also known as unipolar mood disorder, for instance, is a common mental illness characterized by sadness, loss of interest in activities,...
After reviewing Riordan Manufacturing Inventory Management System, it was noticed that the current inventory system needs improvement. There are flaws...
Robert Drewe’s “The Shark Net” suggests that everybody has their own personal reality shaped by their own unique experiences. The text holds the idea that...
Music is a general topic in which transitioned through time according to struggles and hardship faced by mankind during their lifetimes. According to...
Researchers have compared teaching in the USA with teaching in Japan and elsewhere in Asia. The Asian teachers were much more effective. The researchers...

Most Viewed Essays 

What is a biography? As you know the biographies of famous and popular persons are written by the peoples so it is important to see how they write the...
Anti-discriminatory practice is promoted by treating all the children fairly, regardless of their race, gender, religion or way of living. It is important...
Evaluation is important as it feeds into the planning cycle mentioned at the beginning of this unit and enables both children and teaching staff to think...
Everybody makes bad decisions and these decisions can affect them in a small way or lead to great tragedy. In the play Romeo and Juliet written by William...
Adults raised in a dysfunctional home can overcome the effects to bring up the next generation with strengthened values through faith, forgiveness, and...

Recently Added Essays 

This paper proposes to outline the concept and origin of Venture Capital, trace its growth, and highlight the venture capital regulations. It has briefly...
Pupils are now required to have ICT lessons where they can build their knowledge of ICT and its uses; there is also a statutory requirement for pupils...
Transsexualism is a condition in which a transsexual person self-identifies as a member of the gender opposite to the one assigned to them at birth. For...
Transformational Change is a learning a learning process that one must go through when faced with a significant change in their life that has caused a...
The basis of this literature review is to examine the theory of constructivism with direct reference to the teaching of science. In order to do this the...